Best states for truck driver jobs in 2023

Which States Offer the Best Driver Jobs?

Below is a generalized ranking of all 50 states in the United States for truck drivers, considering factors like job availability, pay rates, and cost of living. Remember that individual preferences and needs can vary, so this ranking is a broad assessment and subject to change over time:

  1. Georgia: Logistics and transportation hub, lower cost of living, and good job availability for truck drivers.

  2. North Carolina: Growing economy, distribution centers, competitive pay, and reasonable living costs.

  3. Tennessee: Central location, strong industries, competitive pay rates, and a lower cost of living.

  4. Ohio: Central location, manufacturing sector, competitive pay, and moderate cost of living.

  5. Indiana: Manufacturing and agricultural activities, good job opportunities, and a generally lower cost of living.

  6. Michigan: Manufacturing and automotive industry presence, competitive pay rates, and reasonable living costs.

  7. Virginia: Diverse economy, good job availability, and a moderate cost of living.

  8. Arizona: Growing economy, transportation routes, and moderate living costs.

  9. Missouri: Central location, manufacturing and agriculture, competitive pay, and a lower cost of living.

  10. Wisconsin: Manufacturing and agriculture, decent job opportunities, and a reasonable cost of living.

  11. South Carolina: Manufacturing and port activities, competitive pay, and a lower cost of living.

  12. Minnesota: Diverse economy, good job availability, and a moderate cost of living.

  13. Kentucky: Manufacturing and agriculture, competitive pay, and a lower cost of living.

  14. Oklahoma: Strong energy and manufacturing sectors, good job opportunities, and a lower cost of living.

  15. Arkansas: Central location, strong industries, competitive pay, and lower living costs.

  16. Alabama: Manufacturing and agriculture, good job opportunities, and a lower cost of living.

  17. Iowa: Agriculture and manufacturing, decent job opportunities, and a reasonable cost of living.

  18. Kansas: Central location, agriculture, competitive pay, and a lower cost of living.

  19. Mississippi: Agriculture and manufacturing, good job availability, and a lower cost of living.

  20. Louisiana: Ports and energy industry presence, competitive pay rates, and a lower cost of living.

  21. Maryland: Proximity to major cities, good job availability, but a higher cost of living.

  22. New Hampshire: Access to New England markets, decent job opportunities, but a higher cost of living.

  23. Nebraska: Central location, agriculture, competitive pay, and a reasonable cost of living.

  24. West Virginia: Natural resources and manufacturing, competitive pay, and a lower cost of living.

  25. New Mexico: Transportation routes, competitive pay, and lower living costs.

  26. Connecticut: Proximity to major cities, good job availability, but a higher cost of living.

  27. Oregon: Diverse economy, access to West Coast markets, and moderate cost of living.

  28. Idaho: Growing economy, transportation routes, and moderate living costs.

  29. Delaware: Proximity to major cities, good job availability, but a higher cost of living.

  30. Rhode Island: Access to New England markets, decent job opportunities, but a higher cost of living.

  31. North Dakota: Strong energy and agriculture sectors, competitive pay, and a reasonable cost of living.

  32. Montana: Central location, access to key industries, and a moderate cost of living.

  33. Alaska: Unique transportation challenges, potentially higher pay rates, but a higher cost of living.

  34. Utah: Growing economy, transportation routes, and moderate living costs.

  35. Maine: Access to New England markets, decent job opportunities, but a higher cost of living.

  36. Wyoming: Strong energy sector, competitive pay, and lower living costs.

  37. South Dakota: Agriculture and manufacturing, competitive pay, and a reasonable cost of living.

  38. Nevada: Growing economy, transportation routes, and moderate living costs.

  39. Vermont: Access to New England markets, decent job opportunities, but a higher cost of living.

  40. Hawaii: Unique transportation challenges, potentially higher pay rates, but a much higher cost of living.

  41. California: Booming economy, numerous trucking opportunities, but a much higher cost of living and potential traffic congestion.

  42. New York: Diverse economy, access to major markets, but a higher cost of living.
  43. New Jersey: Proximity to major cities, good job availability, but a higher cost of living.
  44. Florida: Strong tourism and trade industries, consistent job opportunities, competitive pay, and moderate cost of living. With its diverse economy, strategic location, and favorable regulations, Florida offers a promising landscape for individuals looking to pursue a career in the trucking industry.
  45. Illinois: Transportation hub, various industries, competitive pay, but a higher cost of living.
  46. Texas: With its booming economy and massive size, Texas is a top state for trucking jobs. The Lone Star State offers competitive pay rates, a relatively lower cost of living and is home to many large cities and industries, including oil and gas, which means there is always a need for truck drivers.
  47. Pennsylvania: Diverse economy, proximity to major cities, steady job opportunities, but with a higher cost of living.
  48. Washington: Diverse economy, access to West Coast markets, but a higher cost of living.
  49. Colorado: Growing economy, transportation routes, and moderate cost of living.
  50. Massachusetts: Diverse economy, access to major markets, but a higher cost of living.

Remember, this ranking is based on generalized factors and may not reflect the current situation. For a more accurate and up-to-date assessment, it’s essential to research the latest job market trends and economic conditions in each state. Additionally, personal preferences, family considerations, and lifestyle choices should also be taken into account when choosing a state to work as a truck driver.

STAFF CONTRIBUTIONS

Worst States for Truck Drivers

Worst states for over-the-road trucking jobs can be subjective and based on factors such as regulations, weather, pay, cost of living, and traffic conditions.

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